Here is an excerpt from the post by Pooja Badarinath(Programme Coordinator, Advocacy and Research, CREA) at TARSHI's blog 'In Plainspeak'

 

Not all marriages feel contrived, but is it still important to question the hegemonic discourses and systemic structures that all of us have built and continue to perpetuate; that any sexuality outside of marriage and consequently outside the traditional family is seen as an aberration or as ‘the other’. The stigma and the loneliness around non-normative sexualities would perhaps reduce not by normalising the queer but by queering the normal. And this requires not only delinking marriage from sexuality, but also delinking marriage from the family. By this I mean exercising choice, in not only who we desire and have sex with but also who we share our lives with – not necessarily within the framework of a marriage or marriage-like relationship. This choice in many cases might mean – we choose the same people we already share a familial bond with but without the element of coercion of any sort, be it emotional, financial or physical. Consequently we need to ask ourselves: What are we afraid of?

 

Click here to read the complete blog post.

Read More.....

Here is an excerpt from the post by Rupsa Mallik (Director, Programmes and Innovation, CREA) at TARSHI's blog 'In Plainspeak'.

 

"The ‘blanking out’ of gender and sexuality related concerns and needs of disabled women is part of a prevalent narrative that prioritises their disability as the main ‘problem’ that needs to be addressed. The double or triple marginalisation a woman with disability faces because of her gender and sexuality is rarely given any importance. This is not unusual; after all in India addressing sexuality, in general, remains contested and controversial and for disabled women – seen to be asexual, burdens, victims – this issue like disabled women themselves remains completely marginalised. The disability rights movement too ignores this issue and wants to keep the disability rights discourse ‘non-political’ and non-controversial."

 

Click here to read the complete blog post.

Read More.....

On 12 June 2014, a panel discussion is being held alongside the 26th Session of the UN Human Rights Council to examine the interplay of the criminalization of sexuality and reproduction with the international human rights framework. Topics of discussion include the ways criminalization of different aspects of sexuality relates to control over one’s choices, restriction on autonomy, and disregard for consent. Other discussions include gender, cultural, and religious norms and values that contribute to the criminalization of sexuality and reproduction. The panelists will explore these issues through an intersectional lens to enable a discussion of effective and rights‐based strategies to restore the control of every person over their sexuality, body, and life. Sunita Kujur, Director, Programme Planning, Learning and Evaluation, CREA, will speak at the panel, as part of Sexual Rights Initiative, on criminal laws relating to sexual activity and gender expression. Watch a video recording of the event, here.

 

For more information, click here.

Read More.....

Here is an excerpt from the post by Rupsa Mallik (Director, Programmes and Innovation, CREA) at TARSHI's blog 'In Plainspeak'.

 

"Typical legal debates around consent, particularly in India, have been profoundly influenced by a majoritarian understanding of public good. This viewpoint is driven by a conservative worldview imbued with double standards and moral contradictions.  In this framing of public good it is acceptable to legally recognise the marriage of a 15-year-old girl as is done by our personal laws. We allow marital rape to continue unabated. But we fiercely resist recognition of the evolving capacity of and the right to bodily integrity and autonomy of young people to express their sexuality and make sexual decisions. We discuss this in terms of promiscuity and moral depravity. The biggest block to doing this is the continued belief by most that families should be the primary arbitrator in making these decisions. The family remains the primary site of social sanction of consent for young people."

 

Click here to read the complete blog post.

Read More.....

During the 25th session of the UN Human Rights Council, the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI), which CREA is a part of, collaborated with national-level organisations and advocates to deliver oral statements regarding outcomes from the Universal Periodic Reviews (UPR) of Belize, China, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, and Senegal. The SRI also delivered various other statements.

 

Click here to view all oral statements delivered by the SRI, with their corresponding video recordings.

Read More.....

Pages